T O P

St. Louis region’s population grew just 1.2% in past decade, metro drops out of the top 20 for the first time

St. Louis region’s population grew just 1.2% in past decade, metro drops out of the top 20 for the first time

Sobie17

>Still, the city of St. Louis’ population held above 300,000 We did it fam. Wonder what/if the pandemic affected numbers though. Edit: Yep, we stagnant tho.


brickcity314

Some of the census workers here estimated that nearly half of the north side wasn't counted, so we may have actually grown, especially considering the development boom parts of the city has been seeing, housing prices, and occupancy rates.


mathgon

I think an elephant in the room is if you look at the central corridor and south city, you're like...well this is pretty nice if you like a city and balanced with low housing cost in many areas. Then you forget north city is dying. Idk what percent of the population north city is, but that is really not helping. It's sad. Very poor move out the ghetto chasing luxury with luck, are forced out for jobs, or are just not even reported in the census. It all just makes it worst. There is no saving it. I hope stuff like the NGA campus will encourage growth. That's probably the only hope. South city and central corridor can do all the want but if 33% of the city is dying...north city...then we are SOL. I have hope though. I think we are doing a good job fighting the decay and will get through it eventually.


TraptNSuit

The headline is about the region...not the city.


uncle_troy_fall_97

I mean, the blight that characterizes current-day north city (or swaths of it, certainly) is the kind of thing that inspired “slum clearance” projects generations ago, except in reverse: whereas the tenements in NYC’s Lower East Side were overcrowded—and dilapidated, sure, but teeming with humanity—a lot of north city neighborhoods have this problem of block after block of what I’ve heard described as “urban prairie”: just empty lots where homes and businesses used to be, plus plenty of abandoned and decaying houses being stripped for their copper and bricks. I don’t mean to say all of north city is as bleak as this, but there’s a lot of abandonment going on there. It’s a hell of a problem, and even though I’m utterly fascinated by it, I can’t ever come up with a more detailed thought than “this is *a lot* of land that’s not being put to use; surely there are worthy projects it could be used for rather than just sit here”. I just don’t know what it would be. A park (or a network of them), maybe? Because it’s hard to imagine it becoming a built-up, dense city neighborhood again anytime soon—all anyone around here seems to wanna do is move to friggin’ St. Charles or someplace like that.


josiahlo

>all anyone around here seems to wanna do is move to friggin’ St. Charles or someplace like that. Which in itself isn't doing anything for growth of the region. Just increasing sprawl and increasing the cost of infrastructure long term


STLSouthCityDad

Also there’s gang territory. You can gentrify an area all you want but if it’s literally ran by gangs who the fuck would want to live there


TraptNSuit

Well, the problem there is actually a lack of gentrification. Which largely raises the standard of living of everyone in there area. Displacement doesn't happen until much much later. No one is gentrifying North City.


steinanesis

> I hope stuff like the NGA campus will encourage growth. spoiler alert: it's just shifting jobs out of south city to north city


mathgon

And? I think business in south city will subsist even so. This will encourage people to invest in north city. I live in south city and there is plenty of business not during business hours.


Timmybits5523

People will be commuting from south city to north city. No one is moving to north city unless some type of massive redevelopment happens.


[deleted]

I could see some parts just north of Delmar near U City/CWE getting a little better with people who get priced out of the U City/CWE but who still want to live nearby. I don't have a lot of confidence that anywhere else in North City will improve though any time soon.


[deleted]

Yeah maybe a few dozen people will come from other parts of the midwest if there's a specialized job that they can't find elsewhere but not a huge game changer.


2011StlCards

St Louis, like basically all Midwestern cities, is just gonna have to tread water for now. Population shifts occur over time. Right now it's all going south and west, but given time it may change. St Louis especially has an advantage in the future thanks to the fresh waterways. That's something that Phoenix and Las Vegas do not have


daGOAT816

Better than was predicted. Maybe STL is finally turning a corner.


Sobie17

STL City is "bottoming out". Take that whichever way you want to. Good or bad. Unfortunate, for sure. But hopefully it also means the bleeding is starting to slow. Which the entire narrative is just as disappointing even when looking at it in a positive sense toward the future. It's been a lot of pain for a lot of people, for many many decades.


daGOAT816

A lot of sad stories in St Louis.


schmuloppey

Defund the police, I'm sure people will stop leaving /s For real though, the problems are clear and well-articulated. Answer the phone when we call 911, then show up in a few minutes, city needs to join the county, and all the things we all know. Either that, or put blinders on and ignore those two things and the region will slowly die. Choose whichever option you want.


Banana_Wizards

Considering that approximately 10% of the city’s population loss can be attributed to homicide between 2011 and 2020; I can’t agree more. For those interested in where I got the homicide numbers from you can look [here](https://www.stltoday.com/online/50-years-of-st-louis-homicides/table_5e4f1d5c-0808-57be-b4cf-1ad8fa7acc62.html)


jornin_stuwb

There were not 30,000 murders between 2011 and 2020


Banana_Wizards

Correct. There were 1728 according to the article in my post. The city lost 17716 people in the same time frame. 1728/17716 = 0.0975 To convert this to a percentage we multiply by 100. 0.0975*100 = 9.75% which is simplified to ~10%. So of the total population loss ~10% is directly related to those people lost to homicide.


7yearlurkernowposter

Not everyone murdered in the city is a city resident.


Banana_Wizards

Right. Given that non-residents make up a significant minority of victims, it would be irresponsible to consider it when factoring in rounding margin.


Timofeo

You think you’re gonna convince me with some complicated numbers and equations? Where’d you learn that fancy book learnin’ type math anyways?


Banana_Wizards

When I was a kid my parents sent me to Catholic school, and when I saw that poor man nailed to a plus sign I knew they were serious about math.


2011StlCards

Or perhaps that's a reactionary view and the real way to solve the homicide rate is education and economic investment! Kinda like if you have heartburn a lot. You can pop a prilosec everyday OR..... you could just eat things that aren't deep fried One is reactive and just masks the underlying issue. The other is proactive and tries to fix it in the longterm