T O P

Hot Work

Hot Work

JohnProof

We can't do any primary gloving, if that has to happen we need to get a line crew to do it. But we'll use sticks for elbows, fuses, switches, and any hot testing that has to be done.


Emergency_Rope_270

Are you all talking about under ground (URD) transformers when you are talking about elbows?


JohnProof

Transformers, sectionalizers, and padmount switches.


ore905442

Same as this. Working on newer systems we don't do it often though.


JohnProof

Ditto. Everything new is 600A dead-breaks now because of the available fault current.


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In my company, linemen perform hot work all the time up to 25kV. Within substations the only hot work performed (rarely) is by hot sticks. Hot work generally isn't needed in substations.


NStanley4Heisman

Like the others have said, we do most everything involving energized equipment with hot sticks, mostly testing, phasing, knife switches and such. It’s not primary, *but* we take care of the downtown networks in our area and that can involve gloving the secondaries hot.


Emergency_Rope_270

Do you drop or connect hot jumpers with hot sticks?


Joeyhasballs

We look after distribution yards too and we do jumpers to parallel reclosers to change them out


Emergency_Rope_270

Mechanical jumpers?


Joeyhasballs

I dunno, like a 2 foot chunk of 2/0 with live line clamps on each end


Emergency_Rope_270

Well, close enough. It would be interesting to see pictures of that. I wish we used reclosers. It could be a radial circuit without a tie for miles. Distribution will still want a station breaker.


Joeyhasballs

If I remember I’ll try and grab a pic tomorrow


highvoltsparky-

We do hot work when necessary, typically servicing disconnects or making connections/repairs when an outage is not feasible. We use gloves at 4.8kv, and do a hot work scenario annually to keep the skill.


Emergency_Rope_270

Okay, that is similar to how we operate. We glove up to 25kV. It is generally limited to replacing bad jumpers, disconnects, or lightning arresters. My employer’s sister company’s sub maintenance department doesn’t do any type of hot work. I’m just curious how common it is for other companies.


highvoltsparky-

We're a government utility.


ElprofesorAleman

Used to back in the day. But our system does not warrant it at all, the way it is constructed. All devices can be de-energized and isolated. When I was younger and worked as a Journeyman Lineman, that was a different story.


Emergency_Rope_270

Did you do the hot work in the stations, or did they handle their own work?


ElprofesorAleman

Every day when working overhead or some underground. But never in a substation. If your do "hot work" in a substation....then it's not REALLY a substation.


Emergency_Rope_270

How do you mean?


ElprofesorAleman

I suppose what I ment was, a proper "utility" substation has NO equipment that MUST be worked hot. No rubber glove work, or making up taps using hot line tools.


Emergency_Rope_270

I understand. Well, we don’t have much choice. The line department stops at the dead-end bells at the station, so if we have a bad arrester on the frame or a hot switch, sub maintenance will take care of it. There are times when the load can be tied and the line department can cut jumpers on the first span out. Sometime we might have to glove on the bus side because of the inability to get a bus clearance. We also connect mobile subs to hot lines (230, 115, or 46 kV). Sometimes we have to drop or install jumpers, generally on transmission bus. It may be because of the need to keep the bus hot, several station could be tapped off the line or whatever. It’s a large utility in one of the largest populated states.


ElprofesorAleman

Interesting. I work for a large IOU in one of the largest populated states as well.


Emergency_Rope_270

It seems that my employer is one of the few IOUs where the sub maintenance crews glove and stick. Although, in the 90s the company trained different companies all over the US. I found old documents where they trained a utility in the Midwest in gloving. I talked to a guy that started in 72. He said they did not do hot work back then.