T O P
PublicPolicyAdvocate

I don't fix much anymore because it's near-impossible to buy consoles cheap enough. People want $100 for PS4s with no display and no obvious signs of damage.


cmsciguy

This is key. I started repairing as a hobby about a year or two ago when broken electronics were still cheap. I got lucky because video game prices skyrocketed just as I was doing it and made it tons of fun and profitable. Problem is that the "for parts or repair" units also skyrocketed in price over the last year. Refurbished units have slowed WAY down now that people are heading back to work, but the "for parts or repair" listings are still jacked up to the point that it almost isn't worth it. I spend all my time looking for decent enough deals on broken units. It's frustrating because idk who is still paying these outrageous prices for broken consoles when the money isn't worth it at those prices anymore.


marioshroomer

Buy them in big lots. 100 units for 300-400 dollars total. Unless we're talking about ps4's.


marioshroomer

Ask sellers to do their transactions off of ebay and offer to buy from them more often. If anything I am hoping that once I get my website done that I can start taking "some" business away from ebay.


Jealous_Flan1976

what kind of site?


marioshroomer

My own personal site built from ground up. Marioshroomed.com. it isn't on the web yet but its close to being finished.


zacharyjordan23

The name is definitely abstract from ebay


marioshroomer

I was a member of nintendoage in 2007 or 08. I wanted a unique username then. I have always like mario and mushrooms (the kind you get at the grocery). However the joke has always been made that I (mario) am sometimes eating too many shrooms.


zacharyjordan23

Funny


ajohnson132490

What kind of stuff are you trying to sell on that site? Refurbished consoles or just consoles in any condition for people looking to repair consoles?


marioshroomer

Anything video game related. I wanted to become known for repairing consoles and reselling them along side my video games. But that isn't going well so I am reaching out to others for help. Already got one person who is helping and I met him right here on consolerepairs. Im gonna sell video games and consoles similar to dkoldies and lukiegames but im gonna invest a bit more into restoring broken ones.


ajohnson132490

Well if you find yourself expanding into Gameboys or N64’s, that’s my kind of area


marioshroomer

Sure thing. Once I get set up and selling ill buy 100 n64s and 100 game boys and let you have fun. I'll give you credit too and if you want maybe a little money on the side. I'll also cover buying materials like capicitors.


ajohnson132490

I’m down, PM me when you get that site up!


marioshroomer

If it was just an hdmi replace then $100 wouldn't be too bad. But usually there's plenty of underlying issues usually because the seller decided to "fix" the console themselves and we all know how well that goes.


PublicPolicyAdvocate

Yup. Usually they butcher the job where you can't see it. Plus for the A and B models the encoder IC is pretty much unobtainium to buy new, and the average YouTube repair guy replaces 2-3 of them before getting the console running again.


marioshroomer

What does the encoder do?


PublicPolicyAdvocate

Converts the signal from the APU into a signal your television can display.


iitzjackal

I bought the $70 ifixit protect kit a whike back. Paid itself off in one job. Before that I got a knock off not as high quality kobalt kit with only half the bits and non magnetic tips for $40. I'd suggest the ifixit right away. Buy nice or buy twice, I bought twice.... As far and consoles, locally on Facebook marketplace or craigslist is great. eBay is over priced. Just remember to be safe if meeting anyone 😊


[deleted]

[удалено]


Fluffster71

I only do small repairs. If repairing is too much work, I sell as broken or for parts, but keep the games and/or accessories.


wedoconsoles

Profit? What's that? /s I've turned it into a business. I do refurb/repair/maintainence/upgrades. I started with my own Xbox 360 and seeing what I can do, then buying more 360s to repair, and then onto PS3, Nintendo DS, and so on from there. Started with basic soldering supplies and moved on to dremel and even have began doing custom painted cases, both solid color and designed(patterns as well as artwork). I find my consoles and accessories, games, etc. in lots, on eBay, going to yard sales, networking with friends and family about their old game systems, Facebook marketplace, and pretty much any other way one can find consoles and related items.


Odd_Conference_5342

Gameboys and ps2s are great to start with because for the most part they are easy to fix and there are 100’s of tutorials. And I’d also recommend the iFixit it. It’s definitely costly but it’s worth it


Fluffster71

I do sometimes. I have some phillips and torx bits, cleaning brush, rubbing alcohol, thermal pads and paste, some cheap soldering gear, ... The hardest part is finding consoles cheap. The profit is made in buying, not selling. But most people ask way too much for their crap. I also try to either buy a console so cheap that I can sell it for parts and still break even in case I can't fix it. Or it has to come with a load of games and accessories.


nstern2

Right out of college, think 360/ps3 era, I got a job at a local game store fixing pretty much anything that got traded in that was broken. One of the former techs who was a co-owner of all the stores they had bought a bga reflow station and trained me and my superior on it. We also had a generic Chineseium solder station with hot air and a great set of Wiha screw drivers. We got machines everywhere. Local classifieds, ebay, trade ins. I wish I would have taken pics of our wall of parts/broken console storage. It was insane. I enjoyed fixing the classic stuff, but I have to admit that we made absolute bank fixing 360s/ps3s/Wiis so I would work on those primarily.


neverhadlambchops

I do this with N64s usually buy them pretty cheap untested or "broken" on ebay in lots. So far out of the 10 I bought this month, all 10 worked immediately, 2 need a cleaned up reset button and 1 needs work on its controller port. My experience with Craigslist / FB market place has been the inverse and some pretty bold prices. I'm a dog walker , so I'm able to do it as a hobby and win some pretty great non peak auctions from time to time too As for starting I'm completely biased , the N64 just seems overall so easy to me , there's really not a whole lot going on in there.


marioshroomer

I'm working on getting my website up and running so I can sell repaired electronics. However I am not good enough at soldering so instead I am allowing anyone who wants to repair stuff for me and get some recognition on my website as well as a little extra money on the side if so requested. Edit, not just anyone but hopefully someone who is knowledeable in repairing nes or snes or w/e I have on me.


nairblizard

Goodwill garage sales. Just buy a screwdriver set from ifixit. And a good soldering iron with replaceable tips and a temp control. Don't buy a cheap one you just plug right in the wall from wally world.


CharlestonKSP

I used to do a lot of work on early playstations and nintendo consoles, then everyone decided to charge 70 dollars for a for parts PS2... they sell for 80-100 working in good condition so the profit margin went from big to nothing in the span of a few months. ​ People think they have something worth something when it's actually a pile of garbage until someone fixes it, really pisses me off.


KerooSeta

Used and broken consoles have gotten WAY more expensive recently, so I don't do it as much. I've made some good profits here and there modding GameBoys or repairing NES/SNES, but mostly it's a break even at best hobby for me currently. Also, eBay. I live in an area where you aren't going to find anything worthwhile at resale shops. Pawn shops are the worst arround here. I saw a DSi for $150 at one recently.


BlazePlaysRetroGames

I’ve just gotten into this in the last few months for fun. So far just been doing easy stuff like cleaning up Gameboys with corrosion from leaky batteries, repairing 72-pin connectors in NES, replacing busted HDDs in PS4s, etc. I’ve turned a profit on every fix I’ve done but also keep some of the stuff for myself. I keep an eye on Craigslist and OfferUp for stuff listed as broken and look up whether I have the skills to fix it before buying it. I occasionally find things at Goodwill and garage sales as well. If it can fit in a flat rate box I sell on eBay, if not I just put it back up on Craigslist and OfferUp.


zacharyjordan23

Flat rate box isn’t the cheapest. Just read why on pirate ship.


BlazePlaysRetroGames

It’s about ease for me, not price. I spend almost no time or effort on shipping because the couple bucks I might save isn’t worth my time. The flat rate boxes are free from the post office and I can have my postman drop them off at my house. They are standardized in size and you can ship up to 70 lbs for the same price so I don’t need a postal scale or to worry about getting charged extra due to under-weighing the package or using an oversized box. I buy shipping through eBay with a QR code so I get a discount AND I don’t have to write addresses on the package or print out labels. Because it’s all standardized I don’t have to enter any info about the package when I create the auction.


S197MUSTANGG

I found a very similar kit to the ifixit kit on eBay for 25 dollars roughly about a year ago (I needed a new one let my buddy borrow it and he lost like half the bits. It’s like a 118 bit set magnetic nice handle just gotta like in the right place for the right price don’t jump to buying something.


zacharyjordan23

Ifixit has lifetime warranty I think


tymp-anistam

I'm not into the refurb game, but I got a ps2 for $20 from goodwill the other day Kudos on your work. That ps2, I'd pay so much more money for lol


Firekeeper_

I started with a Gameboy advance. I mainly was just trying to see how it worked. I kinda half fixed but I learned what to do next time and went from there. I branched out to PSP, PS1, DS, and then I gambled in laptops and what not. You'll need a soldering iron. Once you learn what your working on the risk of breaking it decreases.